Golf Terms: Best Guide 2022

Golf has a language all its own. If you’re new to the game, some of the terminologies can be confusing. Golf terms are terms used in the game of golf to do with different aspects of the game. Golf is full of its own lingo and terms. In this blog, we’ll define some key golf terms so that you can feel like a pro on the greens. The following is a list of golf terms explained so you will sound like a pro in no time.

Basic and Important golf terms for beginners:

Basic and Important terms for beginners are the first terms that are taught to beginners. These basic golf terms are often seen in beginner’s lessons. The most important golf terms are as follows: and don’t forget to read out true guide about Best Golf Balls for Beginners & Seniors.

Albatross – Double Eagle:

An albatross or double eagle is a score of three under par on one hole. It is the rarest accomplishment in the sport and it is extremely difficult to do.

The first albatross was shot by Sir Nick Faldo at the 1996 Masters Tournament and was called “the shot heard around the world”.

Eagle:

An eagle is a score of two under par on a hole. The golfer has to have reached the green in two strokes and then get his ball in the hole in two more. For example, if a golfer is on the green with four shots, he will have scored an eagle.

Bogey:

A bogey is a score of one over par on a hole. So if you’re playing with a partner, then the golfer who did not score the bogey will congratulate his partner with this golfing term.

Bogey Double:

A double-bogey is when a player scores two over par on one hole.

Bogey Triple:

A triple-bogey is when a player scores three over par on one hole.

Par:

The number of strokes a player is expected to take on a specific golf hole or round. The score a player earns for doing the required number of strokes is called his or her “par”. In golf, anything less than par is called “under par”, and anything over is called “over par.”

Birdie:

A birdie is when a player scores one under par on a hole. If you score three birdies in one round, then you will receive the “hat trick” golfing term.

Bridie Double:

If a player doubles their score on a hole, they have achieved a “bridie double” golfing term.

Birdie Triple:

A triple-birdie is when a player scores three under par in one hole.

Stroke Play:

Players are pitted against each other and each one plays their own ball. The player who finishes with the lowest score wins and usually, this is done on an individual basis.

Drive:

A drive is the first shot played by a golfer. This shot should be as long and as straight as possible and it gets your ball off the tee so you can hit the fairway.

Chip:

A chip is a short, high-lofted shot from off the green.

Chip and Run:

This means that when you are in a difficult spot, you would aim to chip the ball in with as little roll as possible.

Chip and Charge:

A Chip and Charge is when a player chips the ball and then charges after it in order to hit the ball.

Chip and Putt:

This term is usually used for a shot that is used on the green.

Fade:

A fade is when you hit your ball so it curves left to right.

Draw:

A draw is when you hit your ball so it curves right to left.

Fairway:

A fairway is a golf term for the part of the course that is cut short and where you drive your ball from.

Flag:

A flag is a golf term for the stick placed on top of a hole to indicate where the hole’s location is.

Flagstick:

A flagstick is a term for the stick that is placed in the putting green with a flag on top.

Fore:

A golf term for a warning shout given to a player about their upcoming shot.

Ace – Hole in one:

A hole in one is a term for when a player sinks the ball into the cup on their first shot.

Iron:

Iron is a golf term for one of the clubs with more loft than the wood.

Par:

The number of strokes a player is expected to take on a specific golf hole or round. The score a player earns for doing the required number of strokes is called his or her “par.” In golf, anything less than par is called “under par,” and anything over is called “over par.”

Tee Box:

This is the term for the area where you tee off.

Rough:

The rough is the term for the part of the course that you try to avoid because it can be hard to hit out of.

Green:

The green is a term for the area where you hit your ball to put it into the hole.

Bunker:

A bunker is a term for an area filled with sand that you have to avoid in order to get close to the hole.

Mulligan:

A mulligan is a term for when you play a second shot without counting it and not telling your partner.

Pitch:

A pitch is a term for the second shot you play onto the green.

Putt:

This means taking your next shot immediately after you have finished your previous one.

Hazards:

These are a term for obstacles such as water, sand, and rough on the course.

Putt:

Putter:

This is a golf term for the club used for putting.

Round:

A round is a term for the number of holes that you play in golf.

Sand Wedge:

This is a term for a club with a high loft designed to help you get the ball out of the sand.

Sweet Spot:

The sweet spot is the exact point on your club where you make contact with the ball when golfing.

Wood:

A golf term for a long, thick club with a big head.

Caddie:

This is a person who carries your golf bag and clubs for you. Their name comes from the fact that they used to carry the bags on their heads.

Links:

A link is a golf term for an area or course that has natural, sandy areas where the grass doesn’t grow very well.

Handicap:

A handicap is a term for the number of strokes that are added to your score in order to make it fairer.

Pull/Push:

A golf term for hitting the ball to the left or right of where you are aiming.

Short-sided:

This is a golf term for when you are surrounded by hazards or surrounded by bunkers.

Uphill/Downhill:

A golf term for when you are higher or lower than the hole.

Funniest Golf terms for beginner golfers:

Here are some of the funniest golf terms for beginner golfers. Don’t worry – you’ll get the hang of it!

Mulligan:

A mulligan is a term for when you play a second shot without counting it and not telling your partner.

Chunk (Fat) / Thin (skinny):

These are golf terms used to describe a shot that is hit badly. A chunk shot is when you hit the ball fat and it doesn’t go anywhere, and a thin shot is when the shot goes very far but not in the correct direction.

Gimme Putt:

A gimme putt is a term for when you ask your opponent to give you the stroke on a putt that they are only going to make if you don’t.

Dormy:

This is a term for when your opponent hits the ball out of bounds and gets a double bogey.

Scramble:

A scramble is a term for when you recover from a bad shot and hit it better to get par.

Flop Shot:

This is a shot you make when there is no way to reach the green in one, so you hit it up high and let it land softly on the green to go in.

Bogie:

This is a golf term for when you have worse than par on a hole.

Yips:

This is a term for when you miss the ball and then shake your hands around to show that it’s because of nervousness.

Shank:

A shank is a term for when you hit the ball with the sharp, iron part of the club. It goes horrible and far to the side and not at all forward.

Lip Out:

This is a term for when you hit the ball but it doesn’t go in the hole.

Topped Shot:

A topped shot is a term for when you hit the ball with the top of your club and it goes low and not very far.

Slice:

A golf term for when the ball goes very far to the side and not at all forward.

Hook:

A golf term for when you hit the ball very far to the side and not at all forward.

Snowman:

A golf term for when you have all nines on your scorecard.

Waggle:

To waggle is to put your feet in position before you hit the ball.

Fried Egg:

A golf term for when the ball is in a bunker.

FAQs:

What is a blue tee? 

A blue tee is a term for the shortest tees on the course.

What does par mean? 

Par means the number of strokes that are expected to be taken on a particular hole.

How do you score in golf?

You score in golf by finishing a hole with a number less than or equal to the par for that hole.

How do you keep score in golf?

In golf, you keep score by adding 1 to the hole after every stroke, and the person who has the least number of holes is the winner.

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